Inside Superdry’s new flagship store

They get knocked down, but they get up again – perhaps the head honchos at SuperGroup, which owns high street behemoth Superdry, have been listening to some inspiring, Chumbawumba-esque fist-pumpers lately, since despite the company’s recent share price nose dive, they bravely cut the ribbon last week on a huge, new flagship store in London’s Regent Street.

Superdry’s urban-skewed staples, with their enormously popular English and Japanese logo – as seen on the likes of David Beckham, Zac Efron and Pippa Middleton – have made the company one of the fastest-growing fashion retailers in recent years. However, the brand’s admission earlier this month that it had made a little booboo with its financial forecasting, overestimating predicted profits for this tax year by around £7 million, sent its stock price shooting down by 40%. Oops.

Not to be beaten, though (and because the space had been found, kitted out and paid for, obviously), Superdry opened the doors last week of its shiny 25,000 square-foot flagship, where four floors of shopping space, decked out in the urban design essentials of distressed woodwork and rusty metal, are lit by marine search lights from Suez Canal boats. There is even a listed, art-deco spa in the building’s basement, renovated and run by retro salon company, Tommy Guns.

All of the above may sound like an expensive dent in apparently declining profit, and for what? With cut-price Superdry clothing available online and through third party outlets, whose heavy discounts the company also cited as affecting revenue, an expensive new space is not an obvious next step. This fancy flagship, however, brings with it exclusive lines, like a collection of men’s leather aviator and biker jackets available only at Regent Street and online. More importantly, the store will showcase some brave departures for the brand, namely a move into tailoring via a collaboration with Timothy Everest, the bespoke tailor who designed the aforementioned Beckham’s wedding suit, and a footwear line this summer designed with classic English brand, Cheaney Shoes.

Those logo-bearing shoulder blades aren’t going anywhere for a while, but if fashion is about newness and change, then an urban streetwear Dandy in some tidy tailoring might just be worth a trip to Regent Street.